RSS

The narcissism of blogging

28 Nov

BEST BLOG EVERShortly after I publish a new post on my blog, I put a link to it on Facebook. One of my friends linked to my latest post, the one in which I expressed my opinion on an article by Angela Jamenen in the Huffington Post. She wrote about why people ask you to go to church with them.

He apparently took exception to my post. His succinct comment was simply, “My God! Don’t you sound a bit narcissistic?”

The good news is that someone actually read my blog post. The bad news is that I found this comment from a person I respect and hold in high regard disconcerting.

Narcissistic? Me?

Narcissistic? Me?

Just to make sure I understood what my friend was saying (he’s Danish and lives in Copenhagen, so sometimes he is challenged by the nuances of the English language), I looked up the word “narcissism.”

It is defined as “a generalized personality trait characterized by egotism, vanity, pride, or selfishness.”

Hey, that’s not me, goddammit! Well, maybe some of it is. But I’m not a total narcissist.

Okay, yeah, I can see that perhaps I may come across that way in my blog. After giving this possibility some thought, I replied, perhaps somewhat defensively, to his comment:

Well, this was posted in my blog, and if you read my “About” page, you’ll see that my blog is “about things that occur to me, that happen to and around me, and that I find interesting, fascinating, provocative, or just plain crazy.” Notice how many times the word “me” is in there. So, yes, perhaps I may sound a bit narcissistic in my blog postings. But it’s my personal blog, right? So, by definition, it’s all about MY perceptions, MY opinions, MY experiences, and MY observations.

My friend’s response was “Well, it was posted on MY wall, so I comment it as I see it.”

I actually didn’t intend to post the link to my blog on HIS wall. I’m pretty sure it showed up on his news feed, not on his wall. Although I have to admit that I don’t really understand where things end up once posted on Facebook. I’m not sure I even understand the difference between one’s “news feed” and one’s “wall.”

Rather than letting it rest, though, I decided to respond to his last comment. I wrote:

And you have every right to comment as you see it, just as I have every right to comment on your comment, which, by the way, was agreeing with you that my blog post may have sounded a bit narcissistic. But the same thing can be said about virtually any personal blog post, right? Even about most Facebook posts, as well. After all, isn’t the point of Facebook to tell their world, “Hey, look at me, see what I’m doing, see where I am, see who I’m with. Aren’t I special?” I posit that everyone who posts to Facebook sounds a bit narcissistic.

My friend was right, though. Blogging, by its very nature, is narcissistic. Many blogs are personal journals or online diaries. It used to be that people kept their diaries or journals under lock and key hidden in a desk drawer lest anyone see their innermost thoughts or secrets.

Today, though, people post their personal journals on the internet for the whole world to marvel at. Isn’t blogging, then, the epitome of narcissism?

Harsh but true

In a post on a site called Psych Central, psychologist John M. Grohol wrote:

Most blogs are drivel, banal shit written by angst-ridden teenagers and adults sharing feelings, thoughts, and mind-numbing details about their daily lives that provide little insight into anything or anyone.

Whoa, John. That’s a bit harsh, isn’t it? True, but harsh nonetheless. Grohol went on to say,

The best online journals and blogs keep moving, growing, and changing directions, mirroring the author’s own life. They are constantly there, being added to, but if a day or two goes by without an entry, the reader doesn’t feel disappointed. The reader knows and understands that a person can’t perform every single day of their lives. That, in fact, such breaks remind us of our offline lives and responsibilities, and how they’re not always that interesting or need to be shared. In fact, this is what often separates a good journal from a horrible one.

Grohol’s comments are slightly dated, as they predated Facebook and Twitter. With Facebook and Twitter, nothing is too uninteresting not to be shared, it seems.

Many blogs, including my own, were created for no other reason than to allow the blogger to have fun. Like many bloggers, I simply enjoy writing, and I mostly write for myself. I’m not that concerned about how much traffic my blog gets or how many comments people post. It’s a creative process and I enjoy doing it. It’s a hobby.

If someone does comment on one of my posts, whether directly on my blog or on my Facebook page after linking to my blog from there, I consider it a bonus, even if the comment is a negative one. Someone read my blog and was stimulated enough to take the time to post a comment.

This, essentially, is what blogging is all about. It’s a selfie, but with words instead of a picture. It’s more than just “a bit narcissistic.” It’s the embodiment of narcissism.

 
12 Comments

Posted by on November 28, 2013 in Blogging

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

12 responses to “The narcissism of blogging

  1. Mertavius

    November 29, 2013 at 2:31 pm

    I see what your getting at, but blogging isn’t narcissistic. Blogging is a persons way of reaching out to the world. Its what makes us human.

    Narcissism is having people focus on you, for no reason other than its you. Most people write blogs that provide some sort of entertainment value to people who read them.

     
  2. Doobster418

    November 29, 2013 at 2:55 pm

    I think most people, myself included, write blogs because they believe that they are so interesting, so intelligent, so witty, so unique, and so articulate that others will be entertained and informed by what they have to say. Here’s MY perspective, here’s MY opinion, this is MY observation. Read what I have to say. Isn’t it great?

    And isn’t that the definition of narcissism?

     
  3. makagutu

    December 2, 2013 at 9:53 am

    Narcissist or not, it’s a good way to connect with people. And depending on the blogs a person follows, one finds those that are very informative and it’s only personal to the extent that it has a person’s footprint on it but the information contributes to our common pool of knowledge

     
  4. Steve Morris

    January 1, 2014 at 2:36 am

    Lots of good stuff in here. I like your idea about a blog being a selfie, but with words!

     
    • Doobster418

      January 1, 2014 at 9:11 am

      Thanks for stopping by, Steve. Yeah, I thought that “selfie with words” thing was pretty clever, if I do say so my selfie!

       
  5. Lucy

    January 4, 2014 at 8:20 pm

    Love the selfie description. Clever!

     
    • Doobster418

      January 4, 2014 at 8:21 pm

      Why thank you very much, Lucy. I try…and sometimes I actual am. Sometimes.

       
  6. Shortstack

    June 25, 2014 at 6:07 pm

    Blogging can be a way to share perspectives and ideas. It can also be an open forum for discussions and conversations, which lead to further knowledge and deeper understanding. In this way, the voyeurism of writing journal entries traditionally written and read by oneself facilitates knowledge acquisition and the search for Truth. Descartes advocated for the merits of traveling the world as a means of learning these differing perspectives to uncover Truth. Blogging, in this sense, can be akin to traveling, but from the comfort of one’s armchair. Not the same as traveling, sure, but certainly a healthy alternative for those unable to do so. Thus, in that regard, blog on, share your thoughts – blogging in the open could change you and others for the better, and that is an important virtue of open communication that the internet has afforded.

    However, on the same token, inherent “social media” may also be indulging and encouraging the narcissist who would normally only use a journal as an outlet – now we have Facebook, Twitter, blogging, et cetera. If I recall, there are studies examining these things, since the phenomenon is a fairly new one and we are just starting to scientifically examine the impact of social media and the open web, so for now, I speak conjecture.

    As far as open blogging, though, it’s up to the writer to be willing to accept that others will disagree, and possibly use persuasion to change the writer’s perspective. And therein, while not a responsibility per se, might be a pseudo-responsibility to be wise to tricks of manipulation and persuasion and logical fallacy, not only to be wise to them, but also to not use them oneself. Lots of drivel and misinformation is spread across the internet like it’s fact, so if a blogger is to contribute to the conversation, be prepared to be critical of what one reads and what one espouses on the internet. This critical thinking is even more paramount with the age of the internet than ever. Don’t be afraid to have opinions, but be even more willing to change the opinion given new, sound information.

    Overall, however, despite the inherently self-centred nature of online journals (they are simply a more open medium for a journal, which few would suggest is a narcissistic thing, and would often encourage one to write as people like Anne Frank did), they can open dialogue and broaden perspectives, and even if it turns out they feed narcissism, in my opinion the more important thing is that they invite dialogue. Some of the best parts, I’ve found, in “articles” or “blogs,” is the comment section, where people are invited to offer their perspectives on the authors’ and others words. If one commentor says something stupid or incorrect or illogical, they are often called out on it (though other times not, which is why critical thinking is an important skill). Blogs – encouraging narcissism, perhaps. Conversation starter? Definitely.

    So please, blog on. You might have some blog posts that say little to the world, and you might have a blog post that changes the world. I want to see THAT. :)

     
    • Doobster418

      June 25, 2014 at 6:31 pm

      Thanks for your well-thought-out comment. And I do intend to blog on, although it’s highly unlikely that my blog is one that will change the world.

       

What say you?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Victoria N℮ür☼N☮☂℮ṧ

Life, Synaptic Pruning, and the Pursuit of Happiness

The Hillbilly Blogger

A great WordPress.com site

Just something I was thinking about . . .

Not trying to persuade you to think my way, but to make you think period.

Godless Cranium

Random musings of a godless heathen

waltbox

musings, humor, fiction

Texan Tales & Hieroglyphics

A Collection of Somewhat Tawdry Tales of Texas (and of a few 'lesser' places)

Another Spectrum

Personal ramblings and rants of a somewhat twisted mind

A Collection of Musings

A witty outlook on everyday issues you don't usually think about

Truth Shall Set You Free So Don't Be A Crybaby

A dash of wit, A sprinkle of snark, A pinch of sarcastic humor all baked in at 450 degrees!

KSFINBLOG : Global Analyst

Think like a millionaire

Daily (w)rite

A Daily Ritual of Writing

VernonMylife

Old Nut Jobs venting, random thoughts, and humor.

myatheistlife

How one atheist sees life

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Sapient Chronicles

curious leanings of an obsessive intellect

Peg-o-Leg's Ramblings

You say you want an evolution...

lindaghill

Life in progress

Cordelia's Mom, Still

Just Good Reading!

Boomer Connection

Baby Boomers, our journey is the bridge that connects us all

Melissa Barker-Simpson

If I don't write to empty my mind, I go mad - Lord Byron

HemmingPlay

"“Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them.” -- Marcus Aurelius

colemining

made of the myth

I Tried Being Tasteful...

BUT THE STRAIN WAS TOO MUCH FOR ME

Unapologetics

Religion, atheism, philosophy

A.C. Melody

It's not my fault, my characters made me do it...

Malaphors

Unintentional blended idioms and phrases - It's the cream of the cake!

cognitive reflection

It's all about the feeling.

the EXCESSIVE GARDENER

adventures in defensive gardening

Me - Who am I?

Life - How it changes you. Where you go. Who you become.

Waking of the Bear

Living in this world

Aging Gracefully My Ass

A sincere blog about a donkey

Out From Under the Umbrella

playing in the rain

61 Musings

Musings from a 61 year old introvert.

Priorhouse blog

Photos, art - and a little bit of LIT!

janyceresh

If sarcasm and self deprecating humour were an Olympic event I'd definitely qualify.

Trispectivism

simple yet not simplistic

The Write Gardener

Life in and out of the garden

SERENDIPITY

Marilyn Armstrong - Seeking Intelligent Life on Earth

Muddy River Muse

Trees. Water. Sky. Seeking clarity in the meandering muck.

Blog Blogger Bloggest

Strange thoughts, random mutterings

godless in dixie

Skepticism with a bit of a drawl.

Humans Are Weird

colourful observations

Author Miranda Stone

"'Will you walk into my parlour?' said the Spider to the Fly." - Mary Howitt

practicallyserious

Humor, Movie Reviews, Funny Fiction

Creative thoughts and thoughtful opinions

My thoughts, stories, opinions, photos, and adventures, all in one place where the whole world can see them!

Fish Of Gold

Welcome To The Fishbowl.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,533 other followers

%d bloggers like this: