Retirement plans vary by physician specialty

Retirement plans vary by physician specialty

Retirement plans vary by physician specialty

 

Among dermatologists (n = 8), 87.5% had been in practice for over 25 years, and 50.0% were between 56 and 70 years old. The majority (62.5%) reported that they did not plan to retire between the ages of 65 and 70, followed by 25% who said they planned to retire and 12.5% who planned to retire before the age of 65.

The reason for retirement cited by most dermatologists (75.0%) was that they were tired of ballot papers and political, regulatory and insurance situations. Health or family problems were cited by the remaining 12.5%, and financial security / without working at 12.5%.

Oncologists: Of the seven responding oncologists, 71.4% were between 56 and 70 years old, and 87.5% had been in practice for 25 years. Fifty percent reported that their retirement at age 65 to 70 years depended on the circumstances, while 16.7% planned to retire at that time, 16.7% planned to retire before the age of 65 and 16, 7% had no plans to retire. Responses were divided as to the reason for retiring at this age, with 42.9% citing that they were tired of paperwork and political, regulatory and insurance situations; And 42.9% cited financial security. Finally, 14.3% reported that health or family issues would make them consider retirement at this age.

Ophthalmologists: Among the 15 respondents who were ophthalmologists, 73.3% were between 56 and 70 years old, and 86.7% had been in practice for over 25 years. In total, 33.3% thought to retire between 65 and 70 years, 26.7% did not, 20.0% reported that it would depend on their circumstances at the time and 20.0% reported that they planned to retire before 65 years.

Reasons cited by ophthalmologists for retirement included being tired of paperwork and political, regulatory and insurance situations (33.3%), followed by 46.7% who were financially secure and did not need to work, 13.5% reported health problems Or relatives and 6.7% said they would never retire because they love their work.

Pediatricians: Of the 32 patients who responded to the pediatrician, the majority (56.3%) were between 56 and 70 years old, and 78.1% were in practice for 25 years. A 34.4% plan to retire between 65 and 70 years, followed by 34.4% who did not, 18.8% before age 65 and 12.5% perhaps, depending on the circumstances.

The majority (37.5%) mentioned being tired of paperwork, political regulation and insurance situations as their reason for retirement; 31.3% cited financial security, 15.6% health or family problems, 12.5% said they would never retire, and 3.1% cited too many CME requirements and recertification to stay on top of their field.

Obstetricians / gynecologists: Of the 21 respondents specializing in Ob / Gyn, 66.7% were between 56 and 70 years old, and 85.7% had been in practice for 25 years. Respondents were square divided into four equal factions with respect to their plans to retire: 25.0% reported that they wanted to retire between 65 and 70 years, 25% wanted to retire before age 65, 25.0% said that retirement would depend on their Circumstances and 25.0% did not want to retire.

Again, the majority (40.0%) were tired of paperwork and the political, regulatory and insurance situation, 30.0% cited financial stability and 15.0% of health or family problems as a reason for their retirement. In addition, 15.0% reported that they would never retire because they love their job.

Pulmonologists: Of the four responding pulmonologists, 50% were between 56 and 70 years old, and all (100%) had been in practice for more than 25 years. In total, 50% planned to retire between 65 and 70 years, 25% did not plan to retire and 25% responded “maybe”, depending on the circumstances. Reasons for retirement were divided equally between the tiredness of paperwork and the political, regulatory and insurance situation; Health or family problems, too much CME and recertification required; And financial security, to 25% each.

Gastroenterologists: Of the three gastroenterologists who responded, all were between 56 and 70 years old, and 50% had been in practice for 25 years. One (33.3%) plans to retire between 65 and 70 years, one (33.3%) never plans to retire and one (33.3%) can retire according to the circumstances. Two of the three physicians (66.7%) were tired of paperwork and regulatory insurance policy situations, and one did not report plans to retire.

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