Communication is key

Communication is key

Communication is key

 

Literacy begins long before a child learns ABC. From day one, children develop communication skills that enable them to understand and convey words and ideas. Babies first interactions are important constituents of language when they begin to point at objects or follow their eyes to determine what is important. As they grow older, children learn to use language tools to communicate ideas more clearly and more powerfully.

You can promote early communication skills by helping children make connections between what they hear and what they see. By specifying the illustrations in a book or by pressing the words as you read them aloud, you help your child recognize that the images convey ideas and these marks on the page represents a particular word or phrase. Playing with rhymes and singing songs emphasizes the sounds of language, and children over time learn to identify these sounds to the letters. By providing a full impression, using new and interesting words to familiar concepts, telling stories and reading books that generate a conversation, can contribute to the child’s ability to communicate in the world.

Try these simulation game activities to develop your child’s communication skills:

Have a good old tea. Remove the plastic teapot, cups and saucers and encourage your child to dress for a tea party along with friends or favorite stuffed animals. Help your child to congratulate guests by inviting them to sit at the table, to give a “bread” and to facilitate the conversation. Remind your child to demonstrate positive table manners, please say thank you to you courteously and participate in the discussion.
Make a speech. Ask your child to dress as a school principal, a mayor or a favorite princess, and a speech to promote a favorite cause, such as caring for animals in a friendly or sandless manner for conservation parks. Help your child identify two or three major points and use a table or box as a creative podium change to create a formal air.
Play phone. When you and your child play clothes, pick up a phone and pretend to “call” your child. Ask open-ended questions that require your child to really consider the character’s point of view and probable response. Make sure you have fun tibial by using different voices and gestures.

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